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It’s no secret that the opioid epidemic has taken the lives of many. A new study conducted by criminal justice professor Jamie Flexon and her colleagues Lisa Stolzenberg and Stewart D’Alessio examines this epidemic through the lens of recent cannabis laws and their effect on opioid use.

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The study, entitled "Low Self-Control and Environmental Harm: A Theoretical Perspective and Empirical Test," appears in the American Journal of Criminal Justice. Dr. Meldrum and Dr. Pires collaborated with the students to produce the study.

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The report presents findings pertaining to racial and ethnic disparities across five decision points: case charging, changes in charge severity from arrest to charging, disposition type, changes in charge severity from charging to conviction, and sentencing.

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To give police officers more information before they encounter a potential suspect, Dr. Guerette is working with the City of Miami Police Department to build and evaluate what is known as a real-time crime center or RTCC.

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Abuse, neglect and family violence lead the list of ACEs that contribute to poor self-control.

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Drs. Flexon, Stolzenberg, and D'Alessio recently published an article on the link between medical marijuana laws and opioid use in the prestigious International Journal of Drug Policy.

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Doctoral student Christopher Torres is the lead author on a study entitled, “The Effect of Social, Verbal, Physical, and Cyberbullying on Academic Performance,” which is forthcoming in Victims & Offenders. His study uses data drawn from the National Crime Victimization Survey’s School Crime Supplement and ordinal regression analysis to examine the effect of various types of bully victimization on the academic achievement of middle and high school students.

Dr. Guerette received approximately $300k in grant funding from the US Bureau of Justice Assistance to develop a “real time” crime center capability within the Miami Police Department. The project will take place over three years and will employ students from the International Crime and Justice doctoral program.

Dr. Guerette invited to host a webinar for the U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance regarding a grant project involving ICJ doctoral students working embedded within the crime analysis unit at Miami Police Department. He’s also been requested to speak about the project at the national Strategies for Policing Innovation meeting in Arlington, VA later this month.

The report presents findings pertaining to racial and ethnic disparities across five decision points in Clay, Duval, and Nassau Counties, Florida: Case filing; Charge changes from arrest to filing; Disposition type; Charge changes from filing to disposition; and Sentencing.

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