Stephen Pires

Stephen Pires

Areas of Expertise

Situational Crime Prevention, Crime Mapping, Conservation Criminology, Wildlife Crime, Kidnapping for Ransom, International Crime

Degrees

BA, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice, 2005
MA, Rutgers University - Newark, Criminal Justice, 2008
PhD, Rutgers University - Newark, Criminal Justice, 2012

Contact

Office: Modesto A. Maidique Campus, PCA-357
Phone: 305.348.4872
Email: sfpires@fiu.edu
CV: (stephen-pires-cv.pdf)
Website: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Pires

Stephen F. Pires completed his graduate work at the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey under the mentorship of Dr. Ronald Clarke. Dr. Pires is an expert on the illegal wildlife trade with a particular focus on commonly poached species (i.e. hot products), illicit markets, and the organization of the illegal trade. In addition to his work on wildlife crime, Dr. Pires has published several articles on the topic of kidnapping for ransom. In the majority of his research, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is applied to understand how deviant behavior is clustered in space and time, and how GIS informs prevention policy.

Professor Pires’ has presented his research at numerous conferences on a national and international scale. Professor Pires has published in a variety of scholarly journals including the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, British Journal of Criminology, Ocean and Coastal Management, Journal of American College Health, European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, Crime Science, International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice, and Global Crime. These publications can be viewed through Research Gate and Google Scholar.

Professor Pires is a member of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis (ECCA), Center for Conservation Criminology at Rutgers University, and the International Green Criminology Working Group (IGCWG). He has reviewed journal articles for several criminology outlets and recently served as Guest Editor of the Special Issue on ‘Wildlife Crime’ at the European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.